2 years ago   •   5 notes
  • The name of the creator—Frankenstein—soon came to be used to name the creation. That happened within the first decade after the novel was published, but it became firmly established after the story was popularized in the famous 1930s Universal film series starring Boris Karloff. The film was based largely on a play by Peggy Webling, performed in London in 1927.[3] Webling’s Frankenstein actually does give his creature his name. The Universal film treated the Monster’s identity in a manner that reflects its resemblance to Mary Shelley’s novel: the name of the actor, not the character, is hidden by a question mark. Nevertheless, the creature soon enough became best known in the popular imagination as “Frankenstein”. This usage is sometimes considered erroneous, but usage commentators regard the monster sense of “Frankenstein” as well-established and not an error.

    - Wikipedia

    1. seoulasylum reblogged this from 3liza and added:
      Depends on which one you consider to be the “monster.”
    2. 3liza posted this