1 year ago   •   36 notes   •   VIA: capslocksam   •   SOURCE: 3liza
  • Pyro is voiced by the same actor who does Spy, giving the game’s dramatis personae an interesting Captain Hook/Mr. Darling interior dynamic (in Peter Pan, the same actor traditionally portrays both Captain Hook and Wendy’s father, Mr. Darling, which highlights the pubescent female psychosexual drama in Wendy’s choice between joining the pirates and a Humbertesque father-lover, or going home to her real family). The Pyro is the Spy’s “hard counter”, meaning a class designed specifically to counter the abilities of another. Pyro’s wide swaths of flame can catch Spies who are using their class-based abilities, invisibility (“cloaking”), and disguising as enemy teammembers. This physically harms the Spies, but also blows their cover, as the flames are quite visible even when the Spy is not. They are the only two masked characters, and the only two characters who carry open flame—Spy’s in the form of his mascot, the daemon-like cigarette, a miniaturized faux-flamethrower, which trails him with a thread of smoke wherever he runs. Could the Spy have flame-envy?

     -

    The SCUMM Manifesto - Footnotes for “Oasis of the Real: How the TF2 Fandom Stands Apart”

    image

    “Compensating”? Whatever do you mean?

    [spy by Desole]

    (via 3liza)

    1 year ago   •   110 notes   •   VIA: ghostbongweedofthesamurai   •   SOURCE: ghostbongweedofthesamurai
  • ghostbongweedofthesamurai:

    it is 2017. gaben sits at his desk, stately and sporting a dignified beard. he holds in his hand an “inflatable baloonicorn”, which when first released in mid-2012 sold out almost immediately despite its retail price of $29.99. he squeezes it gently.

    “team fortress started out as a labor of love for all of us,” he says, using the unicorn as a gesticulation aid, “but like a lot of our games it became an experiment pretty quickly. for this one, we were looking at how far we could push it.”

    he pauses for a moment, considering the toy carefully before setting it down.

    “and in this case, the answer turned out to be ‘as far as we want to’.”

    1 year ago   •   72 notes
  • if Pyro is revealed to be a “space monkey” i am going to be incredibly angry.

    2 years ago   •   903 notes   •   VIA: fuckyeahgabenewell   •   SOURCE: rawowner333
  • We think there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem. For example, if a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24/7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country three months after the U.S. release and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate’s service is more valuable.

    Most DRM solutions diminish the value of the product by either directly restricting a customer’s use or by creating uncertainty. Our goal is to create greater service value than pirates, and this has been successful enough for us that piracy is basically a non-issue for our company. For example, prior to entering the Russian market, we were told that Russia was a waste of time because everyone would pirate our products. Russia is now about to become our largest market in Europe.

    Our success comes from making sure that both customers and partners feel like they get a lot of value from those services. They can trust us not to take advantage of the relationship that we have with them.”

    We usually think of ourselves as customer centric rather than production centric. Most of our decisions are based on the rapidly evolving opportunities to better serve our customers, and not on optimizing to be a better game company or digital distributor. The latter focus would be more of a straitjacket than conceptual aid.

     - Gabe Newell (via ckoitz3)
    2 years ago   •   19 notes
  • i’ve been thinking about portal all night.

    the uploader of this song calls it “Crying Robots” but to my knowledge it does not actually have an official title. it wasn’t released on any of the soundtrack volumes from Valve, and exists only in the game files themselves.(wilson points out that it IS on the OST, it just turned out i had lost my copy of the second volume for some reason). there are words but they are impossible to make out; possibly more Italian rhubarb; possibly something else.

    this is my favorite piece from the Portal 2 score.  i’ll tell you why later.

    2 years ago   •   36 notes
  • Pyro is voiced by the same actor who does Spy, giving the game’s dramatis personae an interesting Captain Hook/Mr. Darling interior dynamic (in Peter Pan, the same actor traditionally portrays both Captain Hook and Wendy’s father, Mr. Darling, which highlights the pubescent female psychosexual drama in Wendy’s choice between joining the pirates and a Humbertesque father-lover, or going home to her real family). The Pyro is the Spy’s “hard counter”, meaning a class designed specifically to counter the abilities of another. Pyro’s wide swaths of flame can catch Spies who are using their class-based abilities, invisibility (“cloaking”), and disguising as enemy teammembers. This physically harms the Spies, but also blows their cover, as the flames are quite visible even when the Spy is not. They are the only two masked characters, and the only two characters who carry open flame—Spy’s in the form of his mascot, the daemon-like cigarette, a miniaturized faux-flamethrower, which trails him with a thread of smoke wherever he runs. Could the Spy have flame-envy?

    2 years ago   •   37 notes
  • As an online multiplayer-only, plotless, mindlessly-violent first-person-shooter, I had assumed that the female fanbase would be limited; confined mostly to diehard first-person-shooter (FPS) enthusiasts, a subset of games with few female devotees. Fewer in number than female WoW players, or Harry Potter readers, certainly. Despite this, the vast majority of the TF2 fanart posters—and artists—seemed to be women. Weirder still, not all of them even played the game, and very few of them played the game regularly. This was stunning. It was as if I had happened upon a cargo cult—imagine someone showing up to a Star Trek convention with exquisite Spock fan art and a beautiful costume, having never watched the show.

     -

    The Oasis of the Real: How Team Fortress 2’s Fandom Stands Apart

    I have started a game blog.  I told you I’d do it, but you didn’t believe me.

    My first post is in two parts, and will be expanded to three or four in the following weeks.  The topic is one I’ve been studying for over a year: the Team Fortress 2 fandom, and its significance as feminist aesthetic.  I’ve started with an introduction, and moved onto an examination of the Pyro.  Future chapters will deal with specific classes, and the way in which fan artists and writers appropriate and repurpose Valve’s franchise canon, while constructing their own.

    Follow the SCUMM Manifesto today! We Hold Games to a Higher Standard.

    2 years ago   •   108 notes   •   VIA: ectoplasmosis   •   SOURCE: cosmictuesdays
  • cosmictuesdays:

home by ~kopfstoff

    cosmictuesdays:

    home by ~kopfstoff

    2 years ago   •   34 notes   •   VIA: pixibutt   •   SOURCE: pixibutt
  • Always reblog your own work.
(I need to fix Demo’s elbow, it’s pointed the wrong way.)
(also the German is really really really terrible, I should fix that too.)

    Always reblog your own work.

    (I need to fix Demo’s elbow, it’s pointed the wrong way.)

    (also the German is really really really terrible, I should fix that too.)

    2 years ago   •   17 notes   •   VIA: ectoplasmosis   •   SOURCE: ectoplasmosis
  • Midnight TF2uesday: MTP.avi

    ectoplasmosis:

    In 1999, Team Fortress Classic (also known as Team Fortress 1.5) was released as a free additional game for people who bought Half-Life. The game was a remake of a Quake mod known simply as “Team Fortress,” made by John Cook and Robin Walker, before joining Valve.

    Several changes in Valve’s version included total revisions of the character and level designs, as well as the game modes, in order to emphasize teamwork as a gameplay mechanic.

    Being a mod for Half-Life, the game ties into many of the settings in it, including military bunkers and lab facilities similar to the ones explored in Black Mesa, along with similar weapons, such as grenades and the signature crownbar. The lambda symbol shows up frequently, including on the box art, suggesting that the game has some connection to the Half-Life universe, other than being a mod.

    Team Fortress Classic was later released as a stand-alone game, with updated models for the characters, but the lambda symbols remained.

    When Team Fortress 2 was finally released in 2007, it was filled with numerous bugs and misplaced files that were later cleaned up. Up until about two months after it’s release, it was possible to find a “data” folder in the hl2 resource section of TF2’s files.

    Computer/OS(C:)/Users/owner/Steam/steamapps/username/team_fortress_2/hl2/resource/data
    The file held a large portion of discarded content, such as unused textures and scripts that can still probably be found in other locations, except for the ones labled “mtp.” For example: mtp_room.ain, mtp_civ.vtx, etc. Amongst them was a movie file simply titled “MTP.AVI.”

    Upon opening it, a very strange video would start playing.

    The video opens up to marketing data text, as seen in the beginning of TF2’s “Meet The Heavy” video, only the “cleared for public release” line was labeled “no.” In the backdrop is a dark, fuzzy image of a ruined town, similar to the ones found in Half-Life 2.

    The screen then cuts to a seated figure in a chair, wearing a green hood, a leather apron, and a gas mask. The figure is shown seated in a burning kitchen, at a table with four seated (or slouched) burnt corpses. Two of the corpses seem to have animation/clipping errors, as their heads do a weird flail every 4 seconds. On the table in front of the figure is a low-res flamethrower, which the figure nervously grips at. This scene is shown at several angles while a muffled voice, similar to that of HL2’s Combine, but with a much more depressed/human tone to it, mutters something.

    “It never ends. The air is… hey, put some sort of gas in it. With the mask, I’m fine. A lot of these people should be dead. That’s how you know they’re not real. Or bad. Only bad people breathe gas. Fire gets rid of the gas. Gets rid of the bad. I’m okay, I’m okay. The gas burns away.”

    This narration can only be heard clearly after playing with the pitch and eliminating some of the static from the sound file. It can be assumed that the masked person is doing the narrating, but it is not certain.

    The scene then abruptly cuts to a black screen, where the following string of binary shows up:

    010001000110000101101001011100110111100100100000011001000110100101100100001000000110100101110100001011100010000001001000011001010010011101110011001000
    00011001110110111101101110011001010010000001101110011011110111011100101110 

    (Upon translation, it reads, “Daisy did it. He’s gone now.”)

    It stays up for several seconds while a badly-recorded line of Dr. Breen’s (from HL2) plays, “-cide, if you will. Did the lungfish refuse to breathe air? It did not. It crept forth boldly while its brethren remained in the blackest ocean abyss, with lidless eyes forever staring at the dark, ignorant and doomed despite their eternal vi-”

    Another cut is made to a live-action scene this time. The camera is going through someone’s kitchen seemingly burnt out from the inside. It stops at a shot of an oven, where the charred body of someone is laying head-first into the oven.

    And then the video ends.

    Indeed, it’s a very strange thing to watch, and difficult to understand, but here’s what I’ve come to make of it.

    Among the cut content for Half-Life 2 was a location called “AirEx,” a tower that pumped some sort of toxin into City 17’s air. It was supposed to be safe for the Combine, but bad for humans, forcing the citizens in the city to wear gas masks and protective suits identical to the figure in the video when going outside.

    My guess is that given the similarities of the gas mask and flamethrower between the TF2 Pyro character, and the person that appears in this video, that this is an unfinished prototype of what Meet The Pyro would have been if TF2 had maintained it’s connection to the Half-Life universe. The Pyro character may have, at one point, been an escaped citizen of City 17 that became paranoid of the toxicity of the air no matter where he (for the sake of argument, as the combine voice did sound masculine) was.

    However, due to the fact that AirEx was cut from Half-Life 2 and Team Fortress 2 severed its ties with the Half-Life universe, this obviously never happened.

    It is said that one of the few people who came across this video emailed Robin Walker about it, but in his response, he claims that no such video was ever made.

    It has been rumored, however, that one of the guys on TF2’s development team let a cousin of theirs, who was a huge fan of Half-Life, volunteer there for a short time in 2002. He is said to have grown a very creepy obsession with the game as more material for hypothetical storylines, such as AirEx, began to appear in development. He later died in “some sort of accident,” but it was never explained what happened, though it is theorized that it was suicide, as he suffered from severe depression.

    The City 17 Pyro was dubbed as “Daisy” by an anonymous irc channel, after the bizarre binary message in the video.

    After the removal of the mtp files from TF2’s resource folder, it seems that this video was never saved, as it seems to have been all but forgotten and can no longer be found anywhere.

    Flamethrower and gas mask aside, TF2’s actual Pyro seems to have no relation to “Daisy.” The flower-printed purse found amongst Pyro’s things in TF2 may or may not, however, be a hint.

    2 years ago   •   72 notes
  • KritzKreme™

    KritzKreme™

    2 years ago   •   247 notes   •   VIA: d2fang   •   SOURCE: fuckyeahportal
  • 2 years ago   •   39 notes
  • KritzKreme™
In celebration of Meet the Medic.  Demoman usually gets no art love, which I think is a damn shame.  He’s my preferred class, so I owe him this much.

    KritzKreme™

    In celebration of Meet the Medic.  Demoman usually gets no art love, which I think is a damn shame.  He’s my preferred class, so I owe him this much.

    2 years ago   •   12 notes
  • Here’s a snapshot.  Some things will have to be fixed before I scan it, like the eyepatch. This is just because I was so pleased about Meet the Medic—I’m really not much of a fan artist.

    Here’s a snapshot. Some things will have to be fixed before I scan it, like the eyepatch. This is just because I was so pleased about Meet the Medic—I’m really not much of a fan artist.

    2 years ago   •   2 notes
  • Demo doesn’t get enough tribute. I think fangirls subconsciously fear his blackness. And I stupidly forgot his eyepatch.

    Demo doesn’t get enough tribute. I think fangirls subconsciously fear his blackness. And I stupidly forgot his eyepatch.

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